MAY 2024 - BOOK SIGNING THEA WILSHIRE

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This month, we bring you a little history, a few of our favorite items, and a fun book signing!

We hope you enjoy this informative edition and feel free to pass along to your friends and family!


BOOK SIGNING

SATURDAY MAY 11TH

1PM-3PM

AT

THE PICKLE BARREL TRADING POST

Author: Thea Wilshire

Come laugh and cry again with the beloved characters of Nugget, Arizona. “These novels are based on a small mining town patterned after Globe,” explained local resident and author, Thea Wilshire. “I love Globe and had a blast creating quirky characters and experiences inspired by my transplant from urban to rural living.” In the first book, Dr. Zoey Trost adjusts to a new job and her new life in a small town.

What Zoey anticipates will be a challenging adventure quickly unfolds in unanticipated ways with a massive three-legged cat, spunky neighbors, an antagonistic boss, passionate chicken nugget taste-offs, and more. In the second book, her adventures continue as Nugget is hit by a crime wave that rocks the little town and she gets to know her neighbors and coworkers better. Of course, the underwear thief plays a prominent role in this story, too. Wilshire is currently planning on seven books in this series.

Stop in and pick up your exclusive signed copy!


Located in Globe, Arizona, the Sleeping Beauty turquoise mine was one of the most well-known producers of turquoise in the world, producing everything from low grade white chalk to a hard, sky blue material with little to no matrix.

In previous years due to its consistent color, low cost and high availability, it was extremely popular among Native American artists, particularly from the Zuni Pueblo.

The Sleeping Beauty turquoise mine was named after the mountain range where it is located, which from a distance is said to resemble a sleeping woman with her arms crossed. The mine is now closed and the turquoise is highly sought after.


The earliest documented Native American pottery discovered dates back to around 4,500 years ago. As with most early pottery, Native American pottery was born out of necessity and its uses included cooking, storing grains, and holding water.

It’s thought that Native Americans began with covering cooking baskets (made of woven casings) with mud. Wood coals were then heated and placed within the basket to cook the food. They soon found out that the heat actually hardened the mud clay and made it durable enough to be used alone for cooking, without the need for the woven cased basket.

Archeologists realized this methodology after many of the ancient clay pots that were found had indentions and textures, which had come from a basket.

Most Native American pottery was made by hand (there’s been little documentation of a wheel being used), using very traditional techniques. Coiling was the most popular method, and long coils were rolled out into thin sausage shapes and then built round and round on top of each other to make the walls of the shaped pot. Once all the coils were in place, the pot would have been smoothed carefully by hand. 

Chrysocolla is a blue and green stone made of a unique type of copper ore. Its color comes from the oxidation process of the copper ore, which takes on a cyan color with extended exposure to oxygen, but the stone also contains various quantities of other minerals. Due to being somewhat more common than turquoise, Chrysocolla has been popular for use as a gemstone for carvings and ornamental use since antiquity.

This stone is found all over the world, including in Israel, the Democratic Republic of Congo, England, and all over the southwestern United States.


The Navajo are one of the largest recognized Native American tribes within the United States. Around 500 years ago, they made their home the American Southwest. There, they developed a vibrant culture, complete with its own language, belief system, and lifestyle. One of their most significant impressions on modern society has been their rugs.

Weaving has always been a major part of the Navajo culture. While it is not entirely known where they learned to weave, they ended up becoming the most skilled out of all the Native American tribes. The vivid geometric patterns on highly-durable fabrics were renown throughout the Southwest.

The Pueblo tribe is thought to have introduced weaving to the Navajo, or at least a new way to weave using a vertical loom. Thanks to this new loom, as well as raising their own unique sheep called the Navajo-Churro, they were able to begin weaving long, smooth, and durable fibers to make rugs.

Kingman turquoise, mined exclusively from the Kingman Turquoise mine in Golden Valley, Arizona, is highly esteemed for its unique characteristics, making it a prized gemstone in the jewelry industry. One of the distinguishing features of Kingman turquoise is its vibrant blue color, ranging from sky blue to deep turquoise, which is attributed to the presence of copper within the stone. This copper content also contributes to the gemstone's durability and hardness, making it a favorite amongst Native American silversmiths.




Stop in and take advantage of our 20% off all sterling silver Native American jewelry sale!



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